MENU

Blog

The Power of Positive Parenting

September: Tips on Positive Guidance

By: Bright by Three - September 1, 2018

The Power of Positive Parenting: Tips on Positive Guidance

No one likes being the parent with a screaming child in the grocery store. It’s okay, we’ve all been there. What do you do next? Discover the power of positive discipline. Research shows that positive guidance and discipline is the most effective way to guide your child’s behavior.

The goal of discipline is to teach good behavior rather than punishment which strives to stop misbehavior. Punishment doesn’t work because it assumes your child is trying to misbehave on purpose rather than exploring their world, and learning to control their impulses and emotions.

Here are some tips on positive discipline.

From prenatal to 12 months, you can’t spoil your baby with too much attention.  
  • Your child needs lots of positive interactions, rather than negative ones to help them feel safe and build a loving bond with you.
  • Go to your child when he cries or fusses. By responding to your child you teach him that you care and he can trust you.
At 12 months, your toddler can be full of inner turmoil during this year of growth and discovery. Realistic expectations support growth, and prevent frustration and power struggles. Here are some tips:
  • Set simple clear rules and stick to them.
  • Follow routines for meals and bedtime.
  • Specifically tell and show your child what you want him to do. “Put your truck on the shelf, it will be safe there. No one will step on it”.
  • Give lots of reminders. Your child cannot remember rules. He may follow a simple instruction when you give it, but won’t remember it the next time.
  • Your toddler predict what will happen next as a result of her actions. So explain to her why something is unsafe.
  • Distract or redirect your child to another activity when they are doing something undesirable. Explain why you are stopping them, and show them something else to do.
  • Give your child lots of praise when he gets it right. He craves attention  from you, and it will help him learn to do things the correct way again.
  • Give your child the words for her feelings. She expresses her feelings in physical ways because she usually does not have the words or other ways to express them. Tell her “You may not hit me, instead tell me ‘Mommy I’m mad’”. This will help her learn to identify and express her emotions in better ways.
  • Plan interesting things for your child to do. A toddler busy playing is less likely to act out.
  • Try not to compare your toddler to other children as an ideal. Learning about different temperament types can help you understand your child.
At 24 months, your child is becoming more independent, exploring his world and testing limits.
Be aware that challenging toddler behavior is normal and not a measure of your child’s “goodness” or a reflection of the care you provide. Here are a few tips to exercise with your toddler.
  • Provide your child lots of encouragement and praise for good behavior.
  • Distract or redirect your child to another activity when they are doing something undesirable. Explain why you are stopping them and show them something else to do.
  • Instead of just saying no, tell him what you’d like him to do do instead.
  • Offer your child real choices, for example “It’s naptime now, would you like to take your bear or you doll to nap with you” or “It’s cold out today, would you like to wear your coat or your sweater?”
  • Use natural or logical consequences. Natural consequences happen naturally because of a behavior. If your child won’t eat lunch they will be hungry until the next regular meal time. Logical consequences are related to the behavior but used when there is no natural consequence or it’s too harsh or unsafe, a child running near the street is taken inside as a consequence.
  • Be prompt and consistent, and follow through with fair and logical consequences.
  • Ignore misbehavior aimed at getting your attention.
  • If unwanted behavior persists or gets dangerous or aggressive. Remove the child from the situation and provide them some time to cool down.
Tantrums are your child’s way of blowing off steam and getting your attention. Don’t ignore tantrums; rather, show your child better, more appropriate ways of communicating. Here's how:
  • Identify triggers. Do they occur when he's tired or hungry? Watch for the signals that let you know a tantrum is coming. Stopping a tantrum before it starts is the best policy.
  • Stay calm. Children take their cues from their caregivers' words and body language. With your body language, tell your child: “It’s OK. I’m here for you, and I love you no matter what.”
  • Pay close attention. Tantrums often occur when toddlers are striving to be independent and get frustrated when they are not able to communicate or complete a task. Watch carefully, and when you see him about to get frustrated, go to him and help him solve the problem.
  • Don’t sweat the small stuff. Toddler tantrums can be divided into big deals and small stuff. For example, staying put in a car seat when the car is moving is a big deal. On the other hand, a toddler who wants to wear her sandals, and you want her to wear her sneakers? Small stuff. Try avoiding tantrums by sticking to your guns on the big deals and not sweating the small stuff.
  • Hug it out. Try holding your child during a tantrum, and hug her until she regains control. Sometimes a strong, loving hug is all it takes to calm a child having a tantrum.
  • Remove your child from the situation to allow them to calm down. Sometimes they need you to take a “time-out” with them to help them learn to calm down. Try reminding them to take a deep breath, counting out loud, or blowing pretend bubbles.
Get more parenting tips, games, and other resources, based on the age of your child, sent right to your cell phone 2-5 times a week for FREE with Bright by Text. Text BRIGHT to 274448 to sign up!

*Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 274448 to stop. Text HELP to 274448 for help.
Read More...

Your Baby is a Budding Scientist!

August: Digging Into STEM

By: Bright by Three - August 1, 2018

You can also check out this blog post on Denver's top mom blog, Mile High Mamas.

Curiosity is an attribute we must cultivate in our children. Early discoveries, trial and error and tactile explorations are actually the building blocks of science, technology, engineering and math  STEM for short. The world needs more creative people and believe it or not, there are ways s to aid your child in developing these valuable skills before they can even walk! The vast majority of brain development takes place during the first three years of life, so why not pave the way for your baby to become a biochemist while we’re at it. We’ve got some tips and information to help you understand and encourage your baby’s STEM capabilities.


The first year presents tremendous opportunity to get your child thinking critically in their unique way.
 
  1. You’ve probably noticed that when babies interact with their parents, they stare. This powerful stare indicates that she is seeking information. As she continues to grow, she starts to mirror behavior.
  2. Have conversations with your newborn and respond by mimicking her sounds and facial expressions. Describe her actions out loud as often as possible.
  3. Rolling, crawling and moving around are all trial and error for your baby so make sure he has room to move. Your soon-to-be toddler is learning science!

Here are some tips to make your toddler tech-savvy with less reliance on screens and TV!
 
  1. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), even educational programs on TV aren’t as enriching as real life, such as figuring out how a toy works, playing games, or singing songs and dancing with you. That doesn’t mean that technology doesn’t serve a purpose. Learn how to leverage screen time to build your relationship with your child and help her gain skills.
  2. Children are curious and they want to use all their senses to explore the environment. Go out in nature and find shapes and textures in your child’s environment. Offer three-dimensional shapes for her to explore and sort.
  3. Purchase or make your own toys that let children create patterns, build, count and sort. Focus on toys that develop children’s physical, cognitive, academic, musical and artistic skills. Select puzzles with pictures that can probe deeper thinking and question development.
  4. Cut or tear out the pages from an old calendar. Mix up the months and hand the stack of pages to your child. Ask your child to order the months from January to December by laying the pages out on the floor. Which month goes first? Then which one? Which month is last?

Help your preschooler understand basic science principles with these activities and concepts!
  1. Estimating how much a container can hold then measuring to find out teaches children basic skills that apply in math and in science. Hands on activities like this help children understand underlying concepts such as volume and mass.
  2. Learning to assign one number to each object as you count is an important concept for children to grasp. Using children's age as the basis for counting helps them develop this skill as they grow.
  3. You can use children's fingers or familiar objects when you count. You can also put these items in two groups and add them together to practice simple addition.
  4. Learning about speed helps children understand their world. This PBS video shows how six different animals move slow, medium or fast. You can also demonstrate speed by playing a game like Simon Says with your child. Demonstrate slow, medium and fast movements when Simon says.

Get more parenting tips, games, and other resources, based on the age of your child, sent right to your cell phone 2-5 times a week for FREE with Bright by Text. Text BRIGHT to 274448 to sign up!

*Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 274448 to stop. Text HELP to 274448 for help.
Read More...

One Book, Two Books, Red Book, Blue Book

July: Making Reading Fun

By Bright by Three

You can also check out this blog post on Denver's top mom blog, Mile High Mamas!

Summer is here, and between the lemonade stands and outdoor adventures, we can’t forget about learning. Vacations present an incredible opportunity to slow down and read with your kids. You can read about the places you’re traveling and activities you’re planning, or just enjoy the books you’ve come to love. Whether you’re swinging in a hammock or keeping cool by the pool, reading is a great way to relax and explore. Head to your local library with your child and stock up for your summer reading lists. Let them choose books that they gravitate toward so they can get excited about the reading roster.

We’ve gathered some ideas to help you guide your child’s language and literacy skills through the power of reading.

From the time your child is born, you should be reading to him on a regular basis according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Follow these helpful hints to get kids excited about books:
 
  1. By setting an example and showing your child that you love to read, she will be inclined to read more too.
  2. Make reading fun by singing the text to keep her attentive, making the book interactive by pointing at the pictures, or using books that are fun to touch and feel.
  3. Point at pictures and say the names of objects out loud. Your baby will listen and learn the importance of language.
  4. Read for a few minutes every night at bedtime. Soothing routines end the day on a positive note.

Reading every day with your toddler is one of the most important things you can do to help him learn. Check out these suggestions to cultivate a lifelong love of reading:
 
  1. Your 12-18 month old can already choose a book off the shelf, so encourage that independence.
  2. When he looks at pictures of animals imitate animal sounds to bring the book to life for your child.
  3. Find a quiet, comfortable place to read together, or you can read out loud while your child plays near you.
  4. “Read” the pages out of order or in whatever order your child prefers.
  5. Make a baby-proof picture book to teach your child names of family members, friends, pets, and more. Learn more here.

Reading can help prepare your child for preschool by cultivating their conversation skills and increasing their attention span. Here are some tips to get you started:
 
  1. The most effective way to read to your child is to actively involve him in the process by letting him react and interact with the book.
  2. Make reading  fun, verbal, and stimulating. The focus should not be on teaching, but on the fun you’re having with your child while you read.
  3. Set up your child for success by selecting books that will help her learn new words.
  4. Read the world around you. At the grocery store, read labels and find items that start with the same letter to teach the importance of language.

Get more parenting tips, games, and other resources, based on the age of your child, sent right to your cell phone 2-5 times a week for FREE with Bright by Text. Text BRIGHT to 274448 to sign up!

* Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 274448 to stop. Text HELP to 274448 for help.
Read More...

Safety Guidelines Reminder - Ways to Keep Kids Safe

June: National Safety Month

By: Bright by Three - June 1, 2018

You can also check out this blog post on Denver's top mom blog, Mile High Mamas!

Our little ones love to explore. They learn about the world by exploring the objects and places around them. They touch things, they taste things, they walk into things, they jump off of things, all kinds of exploration. That keeps us parents busy keeping them safe!


The National Safety Council has declared the month of June National Safety month to increase the awareness families have about child safety and safety guidelines. There are many safety guidelines out there! Here are a few key ones to pay attention to for young kids at different ages.

Prenatal:
  • Practice safe sleep. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in infants between 1 month and 1 year of age. Following the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Safe Sleep guidelines  are an important step to reducing these risks.
  • Choose a pediatrician for your baby. Be sure to consider the location, office hours, on-call options, and insurance coverage.

Zero-Six Months:
  • Newborns cry a lot, but some can be harder to comfort than others. If you feel yourself getting frustrated lay the baby down in a safe place and leave the room to take a few deep breaths, or call a family member of friend. Never shake a baby! You can also call the Fussy Baby Network at 1-877-627-9227 for support, and information about ways to calm the baby.
  • Practice tummy time with baby. Tummy time while babies are awake is important for the development of their neck and shoulder muscles. The AAP recommends doing tummy time for three-five minutes at a time two-three times a day.
  • When you introduce solid food, introduce one food at a time and then wait a few days to make sure baby doesn’t have an allergy.
  • Take an infant CPR class. It can take some time for babies to get used to eating solid food. Make sure you know what to do if your baby chokes.

Six-Twelve Months
  • Baby-proof and supervise your child. As baby becomes more mobile, baby-proofing your home is important to give your child a safe place to explore, but nothing can substitute for your attention.  Always supervise your baby to ensure their safety.
  • Make sure your baby fits in their car seat. As baby grows, it might be time a for a new car seat. The AAP recommends babies remain rear facing until they are two.

One-Five Years
  • Keep up with well child doctor visits. Taking your child to doctor on the recommended schedule will help keep them healthy, and make sure their development is on track.
  • Watch children carefully around water. Children can drown in less than two inches of water. Stay within an arm’s length of your child when around water. Empty buckets after use, and close the door to the bathroom when not in use.
  • Make sure your child wears a helmet when on a bike, trike, skates or scooter. Emergency rooms see more bicycle and head injuries than any other childhood injury. Helmets prevent head injuries, especially when they fit properly and are worn consistently.

All Ages
  • Never leave your child alone in the car. Children have died from being too hot in the car in outside temperatures as low at 60 degrees. Cracking the windows doesn’t help. Cars can reach 125 degrees in just minutes.
  • Use sunscreen every time your child is in the sun. Even if it’s cloudy and cool. Just one bad, blistering sunburn in childhood more than doubles a person's chances of developing deadly skin cancer (melanoma) later in life.

Get more parenting tips, games, and other resources, based on the age of your child, sent right to your cell phone 2-5 times a week for FREE with Bright by Text. Text BRIGHT to 274448 to sign up!

* Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 274448 to stop. Text HELP to 274448 for help.
Read More...

Taking Care of You

May: National Mental Health Month

By Bright by Three - May 1, 2018

You can also check out this blog post on Denver's top mom blog, Mile High Mamas!

In the parenting world, our children are generally the ones getting all of the attention, care and concern. We recognize that parents and caregivers are important, but their issues and outcomes often get brushed under the rug when we talk about raising a child. But a child’s healthy development depends on a strong family unit and network of caregivers, so it’s essential to focus not only on the young ones, but also their first teachers in life, parents and caregivers.

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month and we’d like to share our love and support for our heroic parents and caregivers with tips on caregiver resilience and pregnancy-related depression (PRD).

As an expectant mother, it’s essential for your health as well as your baby’s prenatal development for you to feel strong and supported. Here are some tips for the months and weeks leading up to baby’s arrival:
  1. Expressing how you feel with a friend, relative, in a group or with a counselor or therapist can help you feel more confident about your new role. Baby will feel that confidence even before he is born.
  2. Support groups can be a great source of comfort as you discover others who are feeling the same way you are.
  3. Building support doesn’t have to be hard - just reach out! Reaching out is a sign of strength not weakness. Embrace your strength by sharing.  
  4. Research indicates that when a mother experiences a relaxed state, the baby’s fetal heart rhythm improves. So relax, take a nap or a bath! Taking care of you is taking care of the baby.
Postpartum blues and depression are common conditions and can be treated. The sooner you receive help, the sooner the healing can begin. Here are some tips for coping:
  1. Don’t try to suppress crying or put on a ‘supermom’ show for everyone.
  2. Get out of the house at least once a day, even if it’s only for five minutes.
  3. Schedule regular time alone with your partner or with a friend.
  4. If you don’t feel better by the time your baby is 1 month old, talk to your physician about your feelings.
The first few months of raising a child are a big transition. Here are some tips for when you’re feeling frustrated:
  1. Place your baby gently in his crib and leave the room while you take some time to calm yourself down, making sure to check on your baby within five to 10 minutes.
  2. If your baby is fussy or hard to comfort, remember you’re not alone. 1 in 5 babies is fussy or difficult to comfort.
  3. Try holding, rocking, or stroking your baby over and over. Babies will take longer to calm down if they are very young or very upset. Whatever you do, NEVER SHAKE A BABY. This can cause serious, permanent harm - even death.
  4. Call Fussy Baby Network if you have concerns about baby’s fussiness during the first year of life: 1-877-627-9227. The infant specialists at Fussy Baby Network will work with caregivers to find more ways to comfort, care for, and enjoy your baby. Fussy Baby Network will also look for ways to reduce stress and ways to help you feel more confident.
For parents of children at all ages, it’s okay to focus on yourself sometimes. Self-care is equally as important to your child’s growth and health as learning games and activities.
Here are some tips for when you’re feeling frustrated:
  1. Take some deep breaths, and feel yourself relax and get back in control of your emotions.
  2. Call a friend, relative, or trusted neighbor. Caregivers need someone to talk with for support, advice, or just to blow off steam.
  3. Take some time for yourself. Go do the things you enjoy and find time to relax.
Get more parenting tips, games, and other resources, based on the age of your child, sent right to your cell phone 2-5 times a week for FREE with Bright by Text. Text BRIGHT to 274448 to sign up!

* Message and data rates may apply. Text STOP to 274448 to stop. Text HELP to 274448 for help.
Read More...