Archives for January 2014

Toxic Stress and the First Thousand Days

Denver had the pleasure of hosting two excellent conferences on early childhood development recently: “The Ann M. Logan Lecture on Early Childhood Development” and “Early Childhood Summit 2014: Understanding & Mitigating Toxic Stress”. Both of these events included Dr. Dipesh Navsaria sharing his remarkable “Toxic Stress and the First Thousand Days” presentation. Dr. Navsaria is so informative, entertaining and engaging we highly recommend all our partners and friends invest the hour to better understand why we are working so hard to promote healthy social-emotional development in 0-3 children.

The Civic Canopy shares the presentation decks for Early Childhood Summit 2014: Understanding & Mitigating Toxic Stress, including Dr. Sarah Watamura keynote address “Toxic Stress in the First Three Years: Understanding and Mitigating the Lifelong Impact”, Dr. Navasaria’s presentation and more. Additionally, they share an excellent toolkit including many great links to research, reports, policy papers and more information related early childhood initiatives. Kudos to Jodi Hardin and the event committee for an excellent production!

Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD is a public health-trained pediatrician and a children’s librarian and as such has a wonderful and unique perspective on the importance of early childhood literacy and toxic stress. Dr. Navsaria is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and practices general pediatrics at Access Community Health Center. Dr. Navsaria is the director of advocacy training for the University’s pediatric residency program and teaches trainees in a variety of settings. He recently received national recognition for his accomplishments in pediatric advocacy as an awardee from the Institute on Medicine as a Profession. Dr. Navsaria is the founder and director of the Pediatric Early Literacy Projects at the University of Wisconsin and is also the founding medical director of Reach Out and Read Wisconsin. Over the last two years, he has served on a small, select working group of the American Academy of Pediatrics promoting a new strategic priority on Early Brain and Child Development. He has lectured to rave reviews throughout the country on the detrimental effects of toxic stress during early childhood and on the importance of early literacy promotion in medical practices.

– Denver Health: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chkvZTREp1M

Closing The ‘Word Gap’ Between Rich And Poor

NPR reports on “Closing The ‘Word Gap’ Between Rich And Poor“:

Research since then has revealed that the “word gap” factors into a compounding achievement gap between the poor and the better-off in school and life. The “word gap” remains as wide today, and new research from Stanford University found an intellectual processing gap appearing as early as 18 months.

We are singing the same tune! Read more about the research that inspired the Bright Beginnings program.